Woolwich Fighting Storms to Repair Garwin, Back Creek Roads

August 1, 2019 0 By newtownpress

WOOLWICH TWP. — During their meeting on July 15, the Woolwich Township Committee passed three measures designed to complete emergency road and drainage repairs to Garwin Road where recent heavy rain storms have caused considerable erosion and damage to the roadway.

On June 22 it was learned that a drainage pipe in a culvert on Garwin Road suffered erosion and exposure of electric wires and a gas transmission line. In order to expedite the repair and prevent further erosion and possible loss of further road surface, Woolwich Township called for the need of an emergency contract.

One ordinance adopted would appropriate $265,000 or $251,750 in bonds or notes for work and materials to partially finance the cost. Woolwich has asked its engineer to prepare a quote for plans, specifications and construction inspection services. The Remington and Vernick proposal of $18,000 was included in another resolution and adopted.

“We will introduce the numbers when they become clear,” pointed out Woolwich Township Mayor Vernon Marino.

In other roadway news, the Committee introduced an ordinance that will reduce the speed limit on Back Creek Road to 35 miles per hour for the length of roadway from the intersection at Kings Highway to the municipal boundary with Harrison Township. Signage and enforcement will take place if the ordinance is adopted on Aug. 5.

“Ten miles is consistent with what we’ve done in the past,” observed Woolwich Township Chief of Police Richard Jaramillo.

“The speed limit on this road has been a concern of the township and the residents for quite some time, and I am pleased to be enacting this speed reduction,” Marino wrote in an email to residents.

In other resolutions, the Committee authorized a shared service agreement with East Greenwich Township for the provision of electrical engineering services. They also expressed interest in the Gloucester County Residential Energy Cooperative. When multiple energy using communities purchase theirs together, it increases the likelihood of lower electricity rates. “The program is good knowledge to have if someone can get their expenses lowered,” commented Committeeman Dan Battisti. 

Battisti listed 33 zoning permits being issued by the community in June. In Municipal Alliance,  Battisti reported that Woolwich Township would be receiving $1,500 for being the first community to turn in its paperwork. Municipal Alliance deals with ways that towns can reduce substance and drug abuse and alcoholism.

Battisti added that the Pennsylvania Horticultural Society was going to consider the Woolwich Community Garden for recognition.

For schools, Deputy Mayor Natalie Matthias reported that 424 students had graduated from Kingsway Regional High School Class of 2019. She noted that Kingsway is taking bids for a new track.

Matthias also mentioned that the school districts have a number of job openings such as first grade teachers, a cafeteria worker, a high school Spanish teacher, a bus driver for the District office, a substitute bus driver, a substitute secretary for the District office, a general cafeteria worker for the District, special education teachers for those in need of employment. Committeeman Craig Frederick took note that the Environmental Commission is considering adding trees to the community, and the Commission was seeking to find a recycling awareness for kids in the fall.

In fire news, Marino listed 48 calls to service for the Woolwich Fire Company, including Greenwich and two for Westville.

The fire company has applied for Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response, or SAFER, federal grants. They have received some extra help, as Senator Cory Booker and Senator Bob Menendez have signed on to the grant.

A SAFER grant provides funding directly to fire departments and volunteer firefighters to increase their top level responders.

In other news the Committee accepted the resignation of Woolwich Police Captain Sheldon Lewis. Chief Jaramillo pointed out that Lewis had been with the local force for 29 years and two months.

by Robert Holt